Gardening Health and Safety Tips

Gardening can be a great way to enjoy the outdoors, get physical activity, beautify the community, and grow nutritious fruits and vegetables. If you are a beginner or expert gardener, health and safety should always be a priority.

Below are some tips to help keep you safe and healthy so that you can enjoy the beauty and bounty gardening can bring.

Dress to protect.

Gear up to protect yourself from lawn and garden pests, harmful chemicals, sharp or motorized equipment, insects, and harmful rays of too much sun. Also take care to dress warmly on colder days and take care on slippery or icy paths.

Wear safety goggles, sturdy shoes, and long pants to prevent injury when using power tools and equipment.

Protect your hearing when using machinery. If you have to raise your voice to talk to someone who is an arm’s length away, the noise can be potentially harmful to your hearing.

Wear gloves to lower the risk for skin irritations, cuts, and certain contaminants.

Use insect repellent containing DEET. Protect yourself from diseases caused by mosquitoes and ticks. Wear long-sleeved shirts, and pants tucked in your socks. You may also want to wear high rubber boots since ticks are usually located close to the ground.

Follow instructions and warning labels on chemicals and lawn and garden equipment. Make sure equipment is working properly. Sharpen tools carefully.

Keep harmful chemicals, tools, and equipment out of children’s reach.

If you’re outside working, even in cool weather you’ll need to make an effort to drink more fluids. Take breaks often and stop working if you experience breathlessness or muscle soreness.

Eat healthy foods to help keep you energized.

Gardening Health and Safety Tips

Gardening can be a great way to enjoy the outdoors, get physical activity, beautify the community, and grow nutritious fruits and vegetables. If you are a beginner or expert gardener, health and safety should always be a priority.

Below are some tips to help keep you safe and healthy so that you can enjoy the beauty and bounty gardening can bring.

Dress to protect.

Gear up to protect yourself from lawn and garden pests, harmful chemicals, sharp or motorized equipment, insects, and harmful rays of too much sun. Also take care to dress warmly on colder days and take care on slippery or icy paths.

Wear safety goggles, sturdy shoes, and long pants to prevent injury when using power tools and equipment.

Protect your hearing when using machinery. If you have to raise your voice to talk to someone who is an arm’s length away, the noise can be potentially harmful to your hearing.

Wear gloves to lower the risk for skin irritations, cuts, and certain contaminants.

Use insect repellent containing DEET. Protect yourself from diseases caused by mosquitoes and ticks. Wear long-sleeved shirts, and pants tucked in your socks. You may also want to wear high rubber boots since ticks are usually located close to the ground.

Follow instructions and warning labels on chemicals and lawn and garden equipment. Make sure equipment is working properly. Sharpen tools carefully.

Keep harmful chemicals, tools, and equipment out of children’s reach.

If you’re outside working, even in cool weather you’ll need to make an effort to drink more fluids. Take breaks often and stop working if you experience breathlessness or muscle soreness.

Eat healthy foods to help keep you energized.

Tips for persons with disabilities and physical activity.

Talk to your health care provider if you have physical, mental, or environmental concerns that may impair your ability to work in the garden safely.

If you have arthritis, use tools that are easy to grasp and that fit your ability. Research shows that 2½ hours per week of moderate physical activity can give you more energy and can help relieve arthritis pain and stiffness.

If you are taking medications that may make you drowsy or impair your judgment or reaction time, don’t operate machinery, climb ladders, or do activities that may increase your risk for injury.

Enjoy the benefits of physical activity. Gardening is an excellent way to get physical activity. Active people are less likely than inactive people to be obese or have high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, heart disease, stroke, depression, colon cancer, and premature death.

Be active for at least 2½ hours a week. Include activities that raise your breathing and heart rates and that strengthen your muscles. If you have been inactive, start out with just a few minutes of physical activity each day. Gradually build up time and intensity.

Warm-up – cool-down

Remember, gardening is like any activity and have lots of positives around physical and mental wellbeing. However, there are the usual risks with overdoing it.

Warm-up your muscles with a simple task before talking the heavier jobs.

Breakup your tasks so you are not doing the same thing for prolonged periods.

Think about your working postures so that you aren’t in awkward or dangerous positions for too long.

 

https://www.cdc.gov/family/gardening/index.htm

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